Sunday, May 24, 2015

Before I Read One

Before I read a book, I look at its cover. Despite what people say, you can tell a lot about a book based simply on what it looks like on the outside. Although you cannot judge a story by its cover, the outward appearance can draw you in and make you want to read the words inside. I love talking about covers maybe as much as I love talking about the novels themselves, so I started a feature to spotlight these essential works of art.

One by Sarah Crossan

Release: September 15, 2015 from Greenwillow Books
Tippi and Grace share everything—clothes, friends . . . even their body. Writing in free verse, Sarah Crossan tells the sensitive and moving story of conjoined twin sisters, which will find fans in readers of Gayle Forman, Jodi Picoult, and Jandy Nelson.

Tippi and Grace. Grace and Tippi. For them, it’s normal to step into the same skirt. To hook their arms around each other for balance. To fall asleep listening to the other breathing. To share. And to keep some things private. The two sixteen-year-old girls have two heads, two hearts, and each has two arms, but at the belly, they join. And they are happy, never wanting to risk the dangerous separation surgery.

But the girls’ body is beginning to fight against them. And soon they will have to face the impossible choice they have avoided for their entire lives.
It is a pressing question when designing a cover for a book spotlighting a physical abnormality—how to portray the subject matter accurately but tactfully. The designers behind R.J. Palacio's Wonder, for example, did a wonderful job of crafting a cover that features but does not exploit the likeness of a one-eyed boy.

And the designers behind One did an even better job. I absolutely love the choice to use connected cut-paper dolls to represent this book's characters; they add a touch of elegance and whimsy—especially thanks to the intricate patterns on the dress—but they do not shy away from the girls' physical connection. And the bright red heart between the two girls is a fitting accent, perfectly representing the sisters' feelings toward each other as well as the empathy Sarah Crossan is sure to bring to the story. I have never before read a book about conjoined twins—despite John Green's multiple expert recommendations—so I cannot wait to meet Tippi and Grace.

5 comments:

  1. This book looks very interesting! I am a twin myself, though I've never met conjoined twins and I think this will be a very emotional one.

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  2. I hadn't heard of this book before but I'm happy you wrote a post about it otherwise I would have totally missed it! I love the cover of One as well and think it's such a clever way of representing something that might be a little difficult to do so on a book cover.

    Also on a side note I am loving all the new YA we are seeing lately exploring some topics that don't really get touched upon. Looking forward to this book!

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  3. You're completely right about the beautiful cover! I'm really glad you featured this book because I might have missed it! Now its added to my TBR and I'm also really pumped that its a book that centers around a topic that so many YA books don't.

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  4. I am counting down the days for this book and I just can't wait! The American cover (this one) is way better than the UK cover because the UK cover just has the word one in pink which is simplistic but I feel as though this cover connects with the story better.
    Naomi @The Perks Of Being A Bookworm

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Thank you so much for leaving a comment! I love to hear your thoughts, and I read every one. You just became one of my favorite people, so I will try to visit your blog in return.